Religion as an adaptive response

Continuing where Hume left off….

Is Religion Adaptive? It’s Complicated
A group of Darwinian theorists discuss religion in Edinburgh

By Jesse Bering

Evolutionary biologist Robert Trivers from Rutgers University, meanwhile, discussed the possible role of psychological self-deception in the realm of religion and reviewed the impossible to ignore evidence that religiosity positively effects human health. And Westmont College biologist Jeff Schloss, who has worked extensively on the theological implications of Darwinism, gently compelled us to consider what these scientific developments in the study of religion will ultimately mean philosophically.

Religion as an adaptive response

A Note to Readers

I will be traveling, and very busy (if it is possible to be any busier than I have been for the past couple of weeks, that is!) so, July will only get the two posts, not counting this one. Won’t return until first week of August. (Long Trip!)

Poland and Tunisia are ahead for me, and I am looking forward very much to the chance to unwind.  Books for the plane are Everyman and Moral Disorder.

A Note to Readers

This post does not exist, article rankings

I am very busy, with sanding the floors of my new house, and projects at work (now is a very good time to be an Architect) so I am not actually producing content today. BTW, there are about 45 to 50 people that read the RSS feed, but don’t show up on the blog stats now. I have been using RSS reader (the one embedded in KDE) recently to read blogs, too.

So here are the articles most read on E_F in the past 30 days, according to the wordpress page counter:

Continue reading “This post does not exist, article rankings”

This post does not exist, article rankings

A note to readers, Kandinsky-Munter book, & SuSE 10.0 can be really cool

I’ve not been posting lately–I have been very busy with projects, including selling my house, buying another one, moving the accumulating detris of 12 years, which will happen later this month–but will have a couple of posts before then, but only a couple.

One will be about the complexity of competition and cooperation and the interaction between these two processes. Quite a lot to quote from, primarily Mutual Aid by Peter Kropotkin on the subject, and how it ties in with a really important work by Allen Scott (Scott, Allen J., “High Technology Industry and Territorial Development: The Rise of the Orange County Complex, 1955-1984.” Urban Geography, 1986, 7, 1, pp. 3-45). I don’t want to wing Kropotkin’s quotes, as its been nearly 25 years since I have read his works, and am unsure if my memory is imputing understandings from other sources.

Also just finished Wassily Kandinsky and Gabriele Munter by Annegret Hoberg, which is an edited compilation of Munter’s and Kandinsky’s correspondence from 1902 to 1914. Great book for reading on the train to work–each letter is so short. Very interesting if you are a big Kandinsky fan, and I came across this book while packing (you can see I am being very efficient-reading each book before packing it!), having forgotten I even had it. In any case, it has some of Munter’s paintings, I would think she is quite under-rated as a painter in her own right.

Continue reading “A note to readers, Kandinsky-Munter book, & SuSE 10.0 can be really cool”

A note to readers, Kandinsky-Munter book, & SuSE 10.0 can be really cool