Tipping point reached

As a follow-up to my post “The tipping Point” from 07 December 2007, it seems that several other sources have come to the same conclusion I had: that the eeePC represents a tipping point.

First, there is LinuxFormat magazine, from the U.K., in its edition no. 106 for May 2008. (Still not available in all US newstands. It also has an article that I am very interested in, about sustainable aspects of free software, which I’ll just have to wait for. Also note that back issues of Linuxformat are available as .pdfs here):

Continue reading “Tipping point reached”

Advertisements
Tipping point reached

The eeePC is irrelevant…and it can disappear (into my briefcase)

Now there’s so much competition that even if the eeePC were withdrawn, or if Asus lost their lawsuit against IBM, the momentum of this new market segment would continue without it. Let’s all do remember too that it was the OLPC that started it all. A whole new market segment initiated by a not-for-profit. Part of the trend of the expansion of the not for profit sector.

Of course, the incumbents are trying to shut the barn door long after the horse has left. Here’s one Sony exec.:

If [Asus’ Eee PC] starts to do well, we are all in trouble,” Mike Abary, a senior VP with Sony US’ IT products operation, told Cnet. That’s just a race to the bottom… if mainstream buyers buy it then whoa…” (Found here)

“IF???” Yeah, right Mike, so what planet do you live on? The eeePC has sold more than 400,000 units, and it can’t be kept on shelves. So I don’t see any justification for the “if”. No wonder Sony is in the pickle it’s in.

Sounds like a game consolebut not one that Sony makes. Like the wii, the eeePC is priced below the competition, it is cool, and it fits into the man maximum/machine minimum trend that’s been going on for the last few years. The eeePC does this by being small and unobtrusive. I can throw it in my briefcase and hardly even know it’s there. Try that with a laptop. Less is more.

This form factor is also inherently much more sustainable than a large format laptop–it uses less power, less materials and is going to be easier to recycle. Of course, each manufacturer needs to do the right thing and get their components from green suppliers, using lead free circuit boards and batteries that don’t contain mercury. But being green is always easier when you’re not so big.

But, look at all the great competition there is! What a glorious race to the bottom!

(They are in the order of e_f’s perception of coolness…)

Continue reading “The eeePC is irrelevant…and it can disappear (into my briefcase)”

The eeePC is irrelevant…and it can disappear (into my briefcase)

The genie is out of the bottle…

An alternate title: Do the large PC players really want to play whack-a-mole? Because that’s what they will be playing, whacking one down, and two will sprout up.

Of course, some 900 lb gorilla of a corporation has stepped up and tried to stomp on the eeepc, or perhaps they just want to cash in on something they really wish they had thought of:

Continue reading “The genie is out of the bottle…”

The genie is out of the bottle…

The tipping point…

The OLPC has succeeded, far beyond what I had expected. What has made it very clear that it has succeeded is the competition that the OLPC has created.

The most interesting competition comes from ASUS’s fabulous little subnotebook, the eeepc, which sells for as little as $299. (Thats right $299–I’m not missing a zero!) It’s the result of collaboration between Intel and ASUS. Despite having a rather weird acronym, it is the tech geek toy and it is also a mass market phenomena. It is the future of mobile computing, and ultimately the consumer desktop as well. It has already sold 350,000 units in its first five months, and ASUS expects to sell 3 to 5 million next year. And it ships with Linux (TM):

1907_l.jpg

Continue reading “The tipping point…”

The tipping point…