Transparency is all reasonable people need to defeat unreasonable laws

It’s interesting that the RIAA-lackeys who are vigorously prosecuting those who founded the Pirate Bay website don’t understand the concept of blowback.   They should: recall the case of Dmitry Sklyarov, or of Ed Felten, the computer scientist at Princeton who was threatened with jail by the RIAA.  I’ve noted before that the draconian enforcement of IP laws will, inevitably, lead to their repeal.   So I say to the clueless RIAA and their stoges, Go ahead, make my day.  

But the strong IP crowd apparently has some clue about how unpopular their ideas are, because they are carrying out trying to carry out the ACTA negotiations in secret.   But–opps!!–that won’t work, thanks to wikileaks and web 2.0 you can’t keep things like that secret. It is impossible to put a lid on any significant information once it is out in the web 2.0 world. For example, here’s some information re the ACTA treaty, and here’s the discusion showing how you lose certain constitutional rights against search and seizures, and here’s the confidential US-Japanese treaty mark-ups.

So, those who want to lock up deceased great grand-mothers and computer scientists know that their laws won’t be popular, and are trying to carry out their campaign in secret.  The light of day (or a tv camera) will destroy the laws they are trying to pass, now matter how many of their lawyers are placed in positions of power. 

The new mantra for those who oppose the ACTA and other strong IP laws needs to be: transparency, transparency, transparency. Transparency is all reasonable people need to defeat unreasonable laws.

Transparency is all reasonable people need to defeat unreasonable laws

Exactly Right

User, frustrated by the DRM not working on his computer, and the fingerpointing between MS and the studios, describes from his viewpoint the result of the implemented DRM technologies:

The irony in all of this, is that the DRM that Hollywood is so much in love with, is really only harming their paying customers. When you do a DRM reset, it’s not your pirated files that get revoked, it’s the ones that you already paid for that are at risk. I’m not allowed to watch low res Netflix files, even though I have the capability to download high def torrents? How does this even make sense? It’s as if the studios want their digital strategies to fail.

Exactly Right

Prediction #12 Comes True…(kind of)

Prediction #12, Comes true…(kind of)

From my Predictions for 2007:

12. There will be a concerted attempt by a group of corporations to make actions similar to the well-publicized investigation by the board of HP during their ‘leak’ investigation legal. These efforts will be both in the form of the contracts which both board members and high level employees will be asked to sign and legislative attempt(s) to make corporations able to carry out investigations, which would otherwise be illegal, of their employees and board members. The corporations will attempt to make even the existence of these clauses exempt from disclosure, as a ‘trade secret.’ There will also be an attempt to introduce legislation to help make these practices legal, and the legislation will be attempted to be passed by ’stealth’ in an eleventh hour amendment to an unrelated bill, possibly posing as an anti-terrorist, anti-espionage item, or as an item concerning corporate liability limits, perhaps as part of tort reform.

Continue reading “Prediction #12 Comes True…(kind of)”

Prediction #12 Comes True…(kind of)