On the rape charges against Julian Assange (I accuse the New York Times edition)

Or why o why can’t we have a better press corps?

The rape charges against Julian Assange need to be remarked upon. Given the obvious motivations of those in power to falsify the charges, the near absence of any concrete exploration of these charges in the mainstream press is both curious and remarkable. There have been no examinations of these charges in the popular press; further it cannot be denied, given what is at stake here, that those charges are a matter of public interest. If those charges can be shown to be fabricated, that, in itself, would be newsworthy. Finding out who is responsible, we will perhaps be able to connect those involved in the fabrication of these charges with those who have the strong motivation to silence wikileaks.  Connecting the dots here could lead to a really excellent piece of investigative journalism, the equal to Watergate.

Some discussion of why these charges seem to be fabricated is in order now.

Continue reading “On the rape charges against Julian Assange (I accuse the New York Times edition)”

On the rape charges against Julian Assange (I accuse the New York Times edition)

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Alternate title: “I really like commentators like Mitch Wagner.”

These are disturbing trends, convergence, again. One extremely important item to note is that corporations and governments both are synergistically creating the environment in which freedoms evaporate.

US government throwing free speech under the bus

Mitch Wagner

What do these three, apparently unrelated stories, have in common? American attorneys general pressured Craigslist to block ads for adult services. The US is trying to extend draconian copyright protections worldwide. And politicians and corporate journalists are banding together to exclude Wikileaks from a proposed federal shield law protecting journalists. These actions are part of a trend limiting free speech to those with government and corporate protection, not the common people like thee and me.

And from the wikileaks blog, there’s a quick link to Glen Greenwald’s blog, with the text:”Obama’s ‘Putinization’ of America must be stopped. I don’t think that is quite right: America is exporting it ‘Putinization’ drive. Instead of heavy-handedly killing journalists a la Putin, it is engaging in a smear campaign, in Sweden.

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This is what the category ‘Corporate Fascism’ is for (British Petroleum Edition)

This should make everyone very angry at BP.  Hopefully not so angry that they would pick up a hammer and take it to the nearest BP station and knock a hole in their pumps, or burn down a BP station or anything revolutionary like that.  Those actions would be wrong.

In any case, here is a news reporter being denied access to a beach because a BP hired security guard (not a policeman) thinks the press should be kept away from the beach:

http://www.wdsu.com/video/23877252/index.html

Just so everyone knows, here’s a list (from Googlefinance)  of who is at the helm at BP while it suppresses our constitutional rights:

Continue reading “This is what the category ‘Corporate Fascism’ is for (British Petroleum Edition)”

This is what the category ‘Corporate Fascism’ is for (British Petroleum Edition)

The First Amendment was kind of nice; now for something completely different…

It appears  the conviction of the SHAC 7 has been upheld.  Not a good day if you advocate any kind of civil disobedience, as it now appears that advocating civil disobedience=terrorism. Yes, you can be branded a terrorist.  As covered at Green is the New Red:

http://www.greenisthenewred.com/blog/shac-7-conviction-upheld-on-appeal/2307/

The First Amendment was kind of nice; now for something completely different…

Vindicated

This was really a foregone conclusion, but it is still nice to hear that the RIAA lost again:

Judge Refuses to Punish Lawyer for Anti-RIAA Blogging

An attorney defending against a music-piracy lawsuit didn’t cross ethical bounds by filing motions broadly attacking the recording industry and posting them on his blog, a magistrate judge has ruled, rejecting demands from the RIAA for monetary sanctions.

Do you suppose that the RIAA feels at all guilty about trying to suppress someone’s freedom of speech? Probably not, but it is a sign of how accustomed we have become to corporate oppression that there isn’t more outrage over this obvious SLAPP lawsuit….

Vindicated